Archive for the ‘ Justice ’ Category

Transformational Tarot – Justice

Transformational Tarot Justice

Transformational Tarot
Created by by Arnell Ando
Published by US Games ISBN:1572815396

The Book Says: The need to weigh decisions, judgments, and find rational solutions. The need for a balanced mind. In this instance, reason and thought should override emotions, although sometimes justice needs to be tempered with compassion and empathy. It can also mean standing up for one’s rights and beliefs. Poetic justice. In it’s reverse this card can denote the seeker dealing with issues of injustice, bigotry, inequality, vengeance, or intolerance.

TarotBroad’s Buzz: This card deliberately evokes the Statue of Liberty and all she idealistically represents. She is the hope of peace, of freedom – to be whatever one desires and believe whatever one wants. This Justice is the dream we all share of having the opportunity to be treated equally regardless of race, religion or socio-economic level. And it is an ideal. We are bombarded on a daily basis by times when justice seems to have been thwarted or perverted but Justice can never be. Justice is the ideal, the goal. She holds out the dove as a sign of hope and promise – we can reach this goal if that is our desire. And as the people behind her represent, all people are offered the same opportunity.

The brilliant white sun is almost blinding in its radiance. A reminder that it has the ability to burn away all the falseness and illusions we surround ourselves with, and get down to the core of the matter. Justice forces us to look at ourselves and see if we are as just, compassionate and empathic as we like to claim. She forces us to face our inner prejudices and bring them out into the light of day so they can be revealed and rendered powerless. I would love to send this card to politicians right now and see if they can recognize the message.

Blue Rose – Justice

Blue Rose Justice

Blue Rose Tarot
Created by Paula Gibby
Published by Soul Guidance

The Author says: The Fool stands, takes a deep breath and reaches one of the items he has carried for so long. Familiar, safe. He hates the very idea of letting any of them go. He turns toward the golden scale encased in its bubble of crystal. He gazes one more time at this treasure that he has carried for so long. And then he closes his eyes. In response, he feels the soft gossamer wings of the white butterfly settle upon his lids and discovers that he can see things with a clarity and “crystality” of vision he has never before experienced. It is enough…the crystal bubble yields to the pressure of his hand as he places his treasure upon the scale.

He watches the tilting of the scale, balancing his cargo again a counterweight manufactured out of his sense of spirituality, inner purpose and his assessment of the obstacles and ultimate goals that lie ahead. He reaches behind him and clasps his hand around the heavy crystal hilt of the Great Sword of Justice. The sword of discernment and discrimination…the sword which severs the wheat from the chaff. He sees what he wants to keep…and what he wants to let go. Taking careful aim, he raises that great sword high above his head. And brings it flashing down.

So, what does the Fool decide to keep and what does he cut away? What does it matter to you, oh fellow Fool? For such determinations and assessments are different for every Fool. Each of us is a unique being. At this time, it is wise to remember a few lines from the discussion of the High Priestess; namely, that there are many paths to spiritual evolution. As many as are needed.

TarotBroad’s Buzz: This is the blind yet all-seeing eye of justice which looks at us, weighs our lives and uses the gold sword to cut away the dross that we need to release. She is pitiless and compassionate, harsh and loving. She knows that if we don’t impartially review our lives at this point and rid ourselves of what is useless, then we won’t be open to new growth and new opportunities. She also forces us to accept that we have now reached a point in our lives where can handle this type of process and learn from it.

The checkerboard pattern on the floor reminds me that now matter how we like to rationalize things, life is sometimes black and white, right and wrong. This is what Justice forces us to see and confront. As we get older it becomes easier to lose ourselves in shades of gray, justifying what we do and how we behave. We lose the clarity and pristineness of youth, the ability to see life in simplistic terms. Justice helps us regain connection with that simplicity but to do in more mature terms and learn how to apply it in our lives in a way that will help us move forward along our path.

Mansions of the Moon – Justice

Mansions of the Moon Justice

Mansions of the Moon Tarot
ZADOK (dahogue@nctc.net)
Self-Published

Traditional Meaning:  Balance, harmony and equilibrium; finding your path through clear-sightedness and being objective rather than relying on emotions and instinct

TarotBroad’s Buzz: The youth of the Bird Girl and her blindfold reminds me of the clearness of youth, that time when we see no gray – everything is black and white, right or wrong. There is no in-between. The scales are currently balanced but the rug with the Celtic knotwork pattern reminds us that things will get complicated soon enough. We manage to become lost in a maze where the line between right and wrong, black and white blur and become less distinct. Perhaps this is part of maturing – everything becomes less clear and simple. But the Bird Girl still watches and measures our motives and our behaviors. The sword nearby is available when she needs to cut through to the heart of the matter. The Sun and Moon in the sky are reminders that sometimes our motivations will stand up to the scrutiny of the harsh light of day and sometimes we prefer the gentler more forgiving light of the Moon.

But Justice is a reminder that either way we must face the ramifications of our choices and our decisions and that sometimes even the best of intentions do not excuse the actions we may take. And that sometimes our actions have repercussions we had not originally planned. The concept of Justice is not easy and it is not always fair. This is something we deal with daily when we watch court cases and see how the legal maneuvering of lawyers sometimes cause guilty people to go free or innocent people to go to jail. Is this just? Is it fair? If we work with someone we know is “evil” for a positive benefit is that just? If we take steps we believe are right but which have negative ramifications, is that just? There are no easy answers. And trying to figure our answers makes me yearn for the simple black and white approach of youth.

Celtic Wisdom Tarot – The Balancer

Celtic Wisdom Balancer

Celtic Wisdom Tarot
Text by Caitlin Matthews, art by Olivia Raynor
Destiny Books, 1999
ISBN 0-89281-720-8

The Book says: The Balancer shows the Goddess of the Safe Passage, Nehalania, who is often known as the “Steerswoman”. She was invoked by all travelers, especially seafarers, and by those transacting business. Here we see her in her British aspect, as Elen, the Goddess of the Ways, who is depicted as a Celtic dancer. Elen opens the ways, both roads and sea routes, as well as the dream-ways, giving free passage to those who take the trouble to map their own soul’s route.
Keywords: Equity, justice, receiving what is deserved, a fair outcome, arbitration, weighing possibilities, vindication of truth, honesty, integrity.
Reversed: Imbalance, injustice, severity, unfair treatment, inflexibility, prejudicial decisions, lies and dishonesty, abuse.
Soul Wisdom: The Balancer of Harmony opens the ways but she also guards them. A life lived in full integrity is one that submits all its motivations and action to truth first, rather than seeking to find out how truth may be bent to serve us. What keeps you in balance with the universe?

TarotBroad’s Buzz: Okay, this one took a while. I didn’t initially see a connection between this image and Justice (or with it’s meaning). But the more I looked at it the more I began to see the light (as it were). The alternating rays of blue and white light suggest a balance between light and dark, positive and negative, consciousness and dreams, masculine and feminine, yin and yang. The woman at the center, Elen of the Ways, is a reminder as well as a guide to show us that we can follow either option; indeed we too can alternate between the two ways. Elen is also the balance between these states, the lynch pin between the lightness and darkness within ourselves. Elen guides us between these two states and allows us to find the balance between the two. Elen, the Balancer, dances her way among the rays and helps us find our way to our center. But as part of the process she forces us to seek the truth, no matter how unpleasant it may be. Sometimes being forced to face the ugliness or the darkness within ourselves is the only true path to balance and harmony.

Another aspect of this card, and Justice in general, is that she seems to be unseeing – her eyes are closed. So her actions are strictly based on her feelings and instincts. She is not judging us based on what she sees. She is impartial. And the holly berries suggest that this can sometimes be a dangerous, even toxic, process. But if we don’t drain the toxins and honestly face the darkness, we risk poisoning ourselves and creating a spiritual imbalance. Elen helps us heal and regain that balance. In the words of Brian Ferry, Elen helps us “dance away the heartache, dance away the fears”

Wheel of Change Justice

11

Wheel of Change Tarot
created by Alexandra Gennetti
Published by Destiny Books, 1997
ISBN #0-89281-609-0

The Book says: When this card appears in your reading, you are at a point of balance and are trying to create a sense of equality around you. You feel as though you can see clearly all sides of the issues around you, you seem to know how to take steps to put things in balance. All the elements of the Tarot are pictured in this card, and this represents the ability to balance the aspects of life that the ancient elements symbolize: body for earth, spirit for fire, emotions for water, mind for air. You have the insight to represent this balance to others in the way you choose to live your life.

TarotBroad’s Buzz: This card symbolizes the harmony we can find in the midst of chaos, the inner peace we can find despite the insanity that surrounds us. How appropriate at this time when we are bombarded on a daily basis with threats of war and violence and the injustice going on in the world. This card shows that if we can maintain our center and find the purity and determination within ourselves to stick to what we know is right, then we can help work towards a place where everyone can enjoy abundance and harmony in their lives.

Something about this card also speaks of being judged. Justice is judging our heart and seeing if we have lived a true life, a life with integrity and balance. She will not accept “I was just following orders” or “What could I do” as an answer. She forces us to look within ourselves and accept that there is always something we can do, always a choice facing us. We may not like the choices offered but what choice we make will impact everything that occurs in our lives after that point.

Justice is the reminder that we reap what we sow. If we make decisions that lead to imbalance in our lives, then we will need to deal with the repercussions. They may or may not be pleasant but they are our choices. Let’s hope Justice guides us to make the right ones.

Okay – I want to start off with full disclosure, I received a copy of the Minoan Tarot from Ellen Lorenzi-Prince for the purposes of writing a review. I consider Ellen a friend but don’t think that will impact my review, I just want readers of this blog to be fully informed.

So, I first got a glimpse at this deck when Ellen brought its prototype to a past Readers Studio. I remember looking at the deck and feeling that it wasn’t one I might feel compelled to add to my collection. The art was lovely but I’ve never felt a real attraction to Minoan culture. In fact what I know about Minoan culture can probably be counted on one hand:

  • Minoan culture thrived on Crete and Thera before the advent of Mycenaean Greece
  • It was severely devastated by the volcanic eruption on Thera
  • It’s where the myths of the Minotaur and his labyrinth are centered
  • Among other artistic and athletic endeavors, it celebrated bull leapers (or is it bull dancers) – youths who trained to leap over bulls and display other acrobatic prowess not necessarily related to competitive endeavors.

I hope that working with this deck will give me a greater appreciation for and knowledge of  Minoan culture.

The deck is packaged in a sturdy cardboard box with an accompanying companion booklet. The booklet offers a brief introduction to Minoan art, civilization and culture as well as information about the origins of the artwork incorporated into each card. There is a lightheartedness and joyfulness to many of the images, giving me the sense that Minoan culture didn’t take themselves too seriously. I don’t get the sense of pompousness and elitism that I often feel from Greek & Roman art – as though they’re above human frailties and emotions.

According to the companion booklet, “The suits of the Minor Arcana, Earth, Sea, Sky, and Art, illustrate the great powers present in the lives of the Minoans. Earth shows children of the Mountain Mother, Sea for companions of the Ocean Father, Sky for the Lady of Heaven and Art for their own expressions of humanity. Sea and Sky are used rather than the more abstract Water and Air because these represent realms of the divine rather than elemental concepts.

The number cards for Earth, Sea, and Sky portray living creatures of those realms, as one of the hallmarks of Minoan art and religion is their exuberant embrace of the natural world around them. The number cards for the Art suit show Minoan people engaged in everyday activities.

The Minoans had no known numerology. The images are assigned to the cards by the correspondence of their energies alone. Also, they do not represent a progression of quantity , but rather stand for the selected qualities, no one of which is greater than another. The key concepts for the Ace through Ten are:

Ace – Individuality
Two – Sensitivity
Three – Creativity
Four – Practicality
Five – Adaptability
Six – Harmony
Seven – Spirituality
Eight – Power
Nine – Consciousness
Ten – Transformation

The Court Cards in the Minoan Tarot are Worker, Priestess, Master, and Mistress. The Workers relates with the energy of the suit in a physical and practical way. The Priestess expresses spiritual direction and action. The Master and Mistress are aspects of the God and Goddess as represented in the realm of Earth, Sea, Sky and Art.”

As an introduction to the deck, I asked “What will this deck teach me?” I drew Art Five, Visionary (Hermit) reversed and Earth Seven reversed. Before looking at the book, my interpretation is that working with this deck will be a struggle but it will be a fun, playful one. It will help me explore areas within myself and connect with my inner spirit but it will be an uphill climb inward. If I want to get the most from this deck I will need to be persistent and stubborn to receive the maximum benefit.

Minoan Art Five Minoan Visionary Minoan Earth Seven

For each card, Ellen offers a background on the symbolism and what it is believed to have represented to the Minoans. She also explains the origins of the artwork as well as three messages from each card. Here are the messages for the three cards I drew:

Art Five

  • Do it. Show people what you’ve got
  • Respect your rules but push your boundaries
  • Your struggle will make you stronger. Consider if it will make you wiser.

Visionary

  • Seek the thousand inner senses
  • What shines cannot be seen at noon
  • Give yourself time for wisdom to grow

Earth Seven

  • Leave the crowd behind to get a clearer look at the whole
  • Have no fear of a challenge, you are up to it.
  • Take the path a step at a time. Make each step sure, strong and agile.

I think each of these messages fits with my take on the card, which means that while these card meaning might not be standard RWS, they are somewhat intuitive.

A few other favorite cards I pulled from the deck include:

Minoan Art Eight Minoan Earth Worker Minoan Sea Ace Minoan Sky Ten

Art Eight, Earth Worker, Sea Ace, Sky Ten – these cards give you a taste of how Minoans viewed the world around them and their connection to it.  They seem to play with the bulls rather than trying to dominate and control them.  There is a lightness and playfulness to the art that vibrates off the cards.  I want to dance and play with these charming people and the creatures that inhabit their world.

Minoan Oracle Minoan Earth Priestess

I especially love the images on the Oracle and Earth Priestess because they show two different aspects of the Snake Goddess, one of my favorite goddess images. She touches my heart with her serenity and simple strength. She has no fear of the snakes and wears them as ornamentation to show her connection with them. I don’t get a sense of domination but of collaboration and cooperation.  I can almost hear them whispering secret knowledge in her ears as she nods her head in understanding.

Minoan Ecstasy

Ecstasy also makes me smile. The dancing priestess is lost in her groove. I feel a sense of ecstasy and pure joy shine through this card. It reminds me of a line from a 70s song Magnet and Steel, “You’re a woman who’s lost in your song.” She has surrendered to the rhythms coursing through her body and celebrates them. She is not truly lost forever but is in a moment of trance, of divine connection. She reminds me of a Sufi dervish, using her dance to create an ecstatic trance state that connects her with the sacred; with the Universe.

There are many lovely cards in this deck all offering glimpses into Minoan art and culture but does that make it a good Tarot deck? I’m sure we’ve all had experiences of purchasing a deck that looks lovely but doesn’t speak to us (I’m something refer to this as a dumb ditz deck). If a deck is lovely to look at but has no depth or character then I often find them useless. I don’t feel this way about this deck. In fact I’d describe it as just the opposite – I think this deck will prove to have quite a learning curve because there is so much meaning and symbolism to be unearth and teased out from each card. This deck strikes me as one that will lead its users down the path to learning more about Minoan culture so that you can acquire greater depth of understanding the symbolism and meanings of these cards. Of course I also think it’s entirely possible to work with this deck and use the imagery to develop your own intuitive meanings without any further knowledge of Minoan culture. It’s a matter of preference.

My biggest complaint about this deck is it’s size. They are the same size as the Dark Goddess Tarot which means the deck will be difficult to shuffle for someone with small hands. I consider myself to have medium-size hands and I find them a challenge. So I will give the deck a borderectomy (I have grown to dislike borders on my Tarot cards) and that should make shuffling the cards easier. Oh and I would love it if Ellen created a longer, more detailed companion book but I digress.

So, to wrap it all up – do I recommend this deck? It depends. If you find yourself drawn to ancient cultures I think you will find much in this deck to feed your interests. If you are interested in learning a bit about an ancient culture that was less aggressive and misogynistic but no less cultured and civilized than Mycenaean Greece, this deck will intrigue you. If you seek decks that challenge you to expand your horizons and explore new perspectives and meanings for the cards, this deck will enthrall you. If you want to support privately printed, small batch published decks then this will fit your bill.

I will admit that prior to actually seeing this deck I was on the fence about acquiring it. The likelihood is that I would have purchased it to support Ellen if for no other reason. Now that I’ve played with it a bit and explored it energies I am eager to give it a longer test run and see where it takes me. The artwork is lovely and calls to something within me I wasn’t even aware existed. It tantalizes me like sunlight sparkling across a still lake. It shimmers and dazzles but in a quiet, understated manner like a classic beauty who is at first overshadowed her her more showy, extroverted sisters but whose true value is soon acknowledge and honored.

So if you haven’t already done so, get your copy of the delightfully delicious Minoan Tarot here

And if you’re still up in the air about purchasing a copy, you can read additional reviews here

Green Man Tree Oracle NGetal

“When nGétal appears in divination, it suggests that health is or should be a priority now. It may indicate the danger of injury when paired with h-Úath or other challenging feda. In positive readings, it may suggest that an injury or illness is healing, or that a course of treatment for a chronic health problem may be going well. It can be a reminder to watch your health or to get something checked on that you might otherwise consider minor. It is a very hopeful fid to draw for those who are ill, as it implies active and progressing healing and the restoration of health and wellbeing.

Linked Concepts: Wounding, death, beneficial magic, healers and doctors, good health, wellbeing, regeneration, hope.” – Ogam:  Weaving Word Wisdom by Erynn Rowan Laurie

Based on the insights offered in Erynn’s Ogam book, I asked the Tarot this question:

How can I start healing myself? Prince of Pentacles R, 7 of Wands + Justice (DruidCraft)

DruidCraft Prince of Pentacles DruidCraft 7 of Wands DruidCraft Justice

I see the reversed Prince of Pentacles as telling me that I’m going to slow; being too plodding. It’s one thing to be cautious and well-prepared; another to procrastinate. I’m procrastinating. I know what steps I need to take to improve my health but I’m putting them off. Avoidance will cure nothing. If I want to manifest good health in my life and heal my body then I need to take action. I don’t need to go from zero to 60 in 10 seconds flat but I at least need to start making a few changes.

The 7 of Wands is telling me I need to be more fierce and vigilant in guarding and defending my personal space and time. Yes, I’m in a situation where I need clearly defined alone time – no internet, no cell phone and no in-laws. So far I’ve been putting my needs in this area as very low on the priority list, something easily ignored or put off until later. I need to stop doing that for my own mental health.

Justice is reminding me that balance and fairness are important. I’ve lost sight of that. To be fair to the in-laws, I also need to figure out ways to meet their needs for physical and intellectual stimulation too. Maybe a walk outside or watching the ducks would do it. Sometimes the mom-in-law can’t focus on things like that but it’s worth a shot. Of course it would also be a good idea to make sure I’m meeting my own needs for physical and mental stimulation. Watching TV and browsing the internet are all well and good but they should be kept to a minimum.

I think I’m finally getting on the right track. If I take it slow and easy I think I’ll eventually reach my goal. I sometimes have a tendency to want immediate results and when that doesn’t happen I quit. It’s time to change those patterns because clearly they are not working for me.

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