TarotHunter’s Salt Rounds:

  • Stop blinding yourself to your truth, it serves no purpose. Look deep within and seek it out. Allow yourself to see things more clearly even if it reveals uncomfortable truths.
  • Try to distance yourself from things to see if you can gain a different perspective. When we are too close to a situation it is difficult to be objective.
  • It doesn’t matter what you ignored or blinded yourself to in the past. Take this opportunity to get a clearer, truer perspective and let it guide you moving forward.

Tarot Hunter’s Salt Rounds:

  • It is challenging to find emotional fulfillment, have a happy home life, when one spends too much time burdened by job obligations. As the saying goes “Work to live, don’t live to work”.
  • Perhaps you feel an inner sense of emotional satisfaction and fulfillment when you help others with their burdens. Be careful not to weigh yourself down in the process.
  • Past emotional damage or an unhappy home life can become burdens we don’t even realize we’re shouldering. Take the time to work through and heal from that emotional pain before it buries you alive.

Tarot Hunter’s Salt Rounds:

  • You think you’re dancing to your own tune but in reality you’re not seeing things clearly. The cycle has shifted but you haven’t adjusted yet.
  • Life is always in a state of flux and change but if we don’t adapt to the changes we risk trapping ourselves in outmoded patterns.
  • As the song says “What goes up must cone down.”. Try to accept the changes rather than getting hung up on what was or what you think things should be.

Tarot Hunter’s Silver Bullets:

  • Wealth and possessions may not cure life’s ills, but it can sure make you feel more secure & protected.
  • Be cautious of letting your possessions, wealth & status isolate you from the world around you. Sometimes a palace can be a prison too.
  • Open yourself up to other worlds, experiences, and viewpoints. Let yourself be more vulnerable and less protected by your things. At the end of the day, possessions provide cold comfort.

Tarot Hunter’s Salt Rounds:

  • Deciding on charitable giving based on benefits to you is self-serving and self-centered. Donating money or resources in such a calculated manner is not generous or humanitarian, it’s egotistical.
  • Accepting aid and succor can be a hit to one’s pride and ego but open your mind and realize that everyone has found themselves on the receiving end of generosity at some point. In ways both small and large, we cycle through giving & receiving in life.
  • Using ideology as a basis for altruism can lead to unexpected and unintended consequences. Supporting charitable institutions that reinforce your beliefs is one thing. Trying to coerce or force them into submitting to your mandates as a condition of your donations is another.

Tarot Hunter’s Silver Bullets:

  • Focus on the help and support necessary to provide aid to those in need; give the excessive verbiage a rest.
  • Hold out your hand if you need assistance. People can’t help if they’re not aware of the need. They also tend to relax their judgementalness in times of crisis.
  • Although logic and rationality are important, in times of trouble or crisis (to quote Paul McCartney) let it be. Help those in need through those rough spots and then work together to create a plan to prevent such situations in the future. Don’t let politics get in the way of human decency.


Tarot Hunter’s Salt Rounds:

  • Resisting dramatic upheaval, especially of a societal nature, may allow the status quo to be maintained but can also lead to stagnation.
  • Societal changes can be frightening and overwhelming but fighting it only prolongs the inevitable.  If we are a truly inclusive society, a place at the table must be set for everyone.
  • Sometimes in order for all to enjoy the “good life” current mindsets and attitudes, the status quo, must be torn down.

Tarot Hunter’s Salt Rounds:

  • Moving forward requires seeing thing clearly. Make sure to remove your blindfold or you may stumble more than necessary.
  • Strategic retreats are often beneficial and crucial to further growth. Don’t let yourself be blocked from seeing the truth in your current situation.
  • Wariness and guardedness can be effective defense mechanisms. They can also prevent you from seeing opportunities and paths that lie ahead. Sometimes letting your guard down is beneficial & healthy; the right move.

I’m being deliberately provocative with the title of this blog post. I am a female and, as such, I was a girl when I was younger. However, I was not raised to think of myself as “just a girl”. I decided to write this post after reading an article a woman wrote about gender expectations and American Gods. This got me to thinking, pondering if you will. Why have I never felt the weight of gender expectations? In fact, I clearly remember a very vehement argument I once had with a former friend about sexism and gender in the workplace. It’s entirely possible that I have been denied promotions or suffered a lower salary because I am female, but if that’s the case I was as oblivious to it as I was to the Stations of the Cross in my childhood church. I simply plowed forward and did my job. If my behaviors upset or offended supervisors because I didn’t act in a typically female way, I either addressed it head on, was oblivious to it, or ignored it.

I have never been told that I could not achieve something because I’m “a girl”. I was never discouraged from trying or accomplishing something because “girls don’t do that”. Sure my parents tried to civilize me and teach me to behave but they also encouraged me to be independent and strong-willed. They regularly gave me the “would you (fill in the blank) just because everyone else does?” speech. I was never encouraged to downplay my intelligence because boys don’t like smart girls. I was never told I was too aggressive for a girl and should tone it down (in fact my father preferred to teach me the correct way to throw a punch). When boys touched me in ways I did not want, I punched them or kicked them in the balls. My nickname as an adolescent was “the Nutcracker”. At the same time, I accepted that if I was going to hit others I might get hit back. I couldn’t use the “I’m a girl” excuse. I was fine with this. Looking back, I was truly blessed to have two parents who never, ever fell victim to gender roles and stereotypes – at least not when it came to me. I remember one Easter my grandmother bought my sister and me matching outfits – they were royal blue pantsuits (think polyester button-down shirts and pants) with T-shirts that proclaimed “Anything boys can do, girls can do better” and a graphic of a girl in a baseball outfit getting ready to swing her bat. We LOVED those shirts and proudly wore them every chance we got. In fact, that saying became our unofficial motto throughout childhood.

I was also influenced by Greco-Roman and Norse mythology as a child. I identified with Athena, the wise virgin who owed nothing to a man (okay, I’m oversimplifying because that’s what I believed as a child). I loved Freya who was the leader of the Valkyries and free to sleep with whom she chose, even if they were dwarves. It wasn’t just independent female goddesses that appealed to me – they had to have a fierceness to them, a martial aspect as well. I loved goddesses who bowed down to no man or god. As I grew older and learned about Irish goddesses I felt a strong connection to many of them too. Once again, fierce feminine figures who were not bound to a male.

Looking back, I am also a product of my generation. I grew up in the 70s and clearly remember the hoopla that following the tennis match between Billie Jean King and Bobby Riggs. I remember how excited I was when Charlie’s Angels premiered! Yes, in retrospect it was a T&A show but as a young girl, all I saw were these tough, independent women who took on bad guys every week and triumphed. I was a fan of both Wonder Woman with Lynda Carter, Isis, and Electra Woman & Dyna Girl. I read Wonder Woman and Supergirl comic books. I remember being vaguely disappointed when the ERA was defeated. I didn’t fully understand what it was or why I wanted it but I knew that its failure was not a good thing for me. I remember having an epiphany during a religious class in Catholic high school when our teacher while conducting a cakes & wine ritual, informed us that ancient frescoes showed that women administered the sacraments in the early Christian church. I was floored! It never occurred to me that women could serve as priests. I often think that this was the pivotal moment that ultimately led me to pursue Paganism.

So, it occurs to me that if we don’t want to raise our daughters to be “just girls” we need to reinforce that message. We need to support them when they show interest in traditionally “ungirly” things or behave in non-girly ways. We also need to let them know that if they choose to pursue traditionally feminine pursuits, that is wonderful too. It’s so easy to denigrate traditional feminine pursuits, interests, and behaviors but that’s just as damaging as only allowing them to pursue these things. Some girls want to be fairy princesses and some want to be G.I. Joe. Some want to play with dolls and some want to play with toy guns. Some will do both and all of that is great and should be encouraged. For that matter, we should use the same approach with boys. I guess the important thing is to focus on what the child wants and needs and make sure to nurture and support them. Sounds easy and yet somehow we make it so complicated.

The Hermit – After having our world turned upside down we might find ourselves in need of a retreat; to regroup. Instead of considering what we need to do to conquer the world, we ponder what will allow us to fulfill ourselves. We are still searching the darkness and trying to forge our own path through the darkness but now it’s the darkness within ourselves. We’re working towards finding truths in our soul that will allow us to lead a more fulfilling life moving ahead.

Strength reminds us that enacting these types of changes in our lives requires fortitude and inner strength; the need to stick with it especially when the going gets rough. This card reminds me of people who, after some dramatic shift in their career or life, manage to pick themselves back up and move forward again. It symbolizes those who find the inner fortitude to add a second act to their lives. The divorced woman who finds her passion in life again. The middle-aged man who discovers that he still has a lot to offer. Instead of letting themselves become defeated and miserable, they pull themselves up and find new meaning in their lives. They fight to find fulfillment and satisfaction.

The Chariot is our mode of transportation to get to that new place of fulfillment and satisfaction. Once we’ve made the decision and set the intention to find new meaning in our lives in Strength, we need to find the way to make it happen. We need to pick up the reins, grab the steering wheel and drive ourselves towards our new destination. We need to determine what route will serve us best and what speed we intend to travel. Do we want to take our time and enjoy some rest stops or do we want to get there as fast as we can? Either way, the decision and the choices are all on us. Do we believe this part of our lives has been fated? Is it our destiny to make this journey? Only you can decide that for yourself.

The Lovers reflect all the choices that still remain in our journey through life. I often like to view fate or destiny as a series of points on a map that we must experience – how we get there and how long the journey takes is up to us. I like to think it’s the combination of destined experiences and personal preferences that are reflected by the two different horses in this card. How & where we choose to steer them is on us.

The Hierophant shows us as we step into our role as mentors, lore keepers, historians. We have now reached a point in our lives when we can teach and guide others. We can show them the options available to them; share our stories. We can help open their eyes to the traditions and history that preceded them and allow them to determine who they might wish to incorporate this knowledge and wisdom into their own lives.

The Emperor is our journey to self-sovereignty. We no longer need to build an external empire, instead, we need to feel as though we are finally in charge of our own lives. We are the masters of our fate; the lords of all we survey. We no longer see success as an external measure but rather an internal one of personal satisfaction and fulfillment. It’s not about money and possessions, it’s about feelings of accomplishment and pride.

The Empress is when we finally learn how to nurture and embrace our true selves. We finally allow ourselves to explore our internal creative energy. Instead of feeling the need to focus on external objects or people, we aim it at ourselves. We tend and care for our own secret gardens and learn to feed our inner needs and desires. It doesn’t make us selfish but rather self-centered in the best possible way. Tending to ourselves allows us to replenish our resources and be there for others when the need arises.

The High Priestess guards the veil behind her. It is not something she parts lightly because one what awaits behind it is revealed, it can never be unknown again. When she pulls it aside we realize that what it hides is our true selves. We are finally ready to learn, accept and embrace who we truly are and were meant to be. We realize that we need to do things for ourselves; to nurture our souls not because they meet someone else’s need. In my experience, when the veil parted I was faced with my feral thirteen year old self – the part of me I’d tried (and failed) to civilize over the years. I was able to reconnect with that energy and unleash her into my life today. It was quite an amazing experience.

The Magician allows us to realize that (much like Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz), the power to make things happen in our lives was in our hands the entire time. We are not dependent upon others to grant us power; we merely need to accept and grasp it. We often hear people talk about helping to empower others but the truth is we cannot do that. We can only help them understand that the power lies within them and only they can use it. That is what The Magician shows us at this point in our journey. Perhaps it’s near the end of the road but the message is no less valuable.

The Fool is our final stop. This is when we embrace all our foolish qualities and trust in the world again as we prepare to take that leap and move beyond this life into something new and unexpected. We are still leaping into the unknown but now all our knowledge and wisdom has combined to make us realize that we truly know nothing and the journey is always about the experiences and the learning. We have to believe that what awaits beyond is something new and exciting. Perhaps this is why so many of us believe in an afterlife – we want to believe we are leaping into something,  not just nothingness.


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